Cancer Health Disparities

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) defines “cancer health disparities” as adverse differences in cancer incidence (new cases), cancer prevalence (all existing cases), cancer death (mortality), cancer survivorship, and burden of cancer or related health conditions that exist among specific population groups in the United States. These population groups may be characterized by age, disability, education, ethnicity, gender, geographic location, income, or race. People who are poor, lack health insurance, and are medically underserved (have limited or no access to effective health care)—regardless of ethnic and racial background—often experience a greater burden of disease than the general population. Cancer incidence and…

Summary of Goals

GOAL 1 Primary prevention of cancer through healthy living is addressed at all levels across the state. Objective 1.1: Promote and support policies, systems and environmental changes that optimize healthy living through good nutrition, increased physical activity and tobacco avoidance Objective 1.2: Promote and support policies, systems and environmental changes to reduce exposure to environmental carcinogens and cancer-related infectious agents GOAL 2 High-quality cancer screening and early detection services are available to all people living in Connecticut. Objective 2.1: Support policy, systems and environmental changes that increase the percentage of Connecticut residents receiving recommended and appropriate breast, cervical, colorectal and…

Updated Cancer Disparity Info

Examples of Cancer Disparities Although cancer incidence and mortality overall are declining in all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, certain groups continue to be at increased risk of developing or dying from particular cancers. Some key cancer incidence and mortality disparities among U.S. racial/ethnic groups include: African Americans have higher death rates than all other groups for many, although not all, cancer types. African American women are much more likely than white women to die of breast cancer. The mortality gap is widening as the incidence rate in African American women, which in the past had been lower than that…